Skip to main content
Events Calendar
 
 

The University of Oregon is planning for a responsible and safe to return to in-person, on-campus instruction, in compliance and coordination with federal, state, and local orders and guidance. Visit the link below for more information.

COVID-19 Updates and Information

 

INTERWOVEN NARRATIVES IN THE BUILT ENVIRONMENT: INDIGENOUS RESURGENCE AS A PATH TOWARD LONG-TERM RESILIENCE

Thursday, February 25 at 2:30pm

Virtual Event

PRESENTED BY:
DR. JAMES MILLER, ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF COMPARATIVE INDIGENOUS STUDIES AT WESTERN WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY WITH A JOINT APPOINTMENT IN CANADIAN – AMERICAN STUDIES, SALISH SEA STUDIES, AND ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES.

MODERATED BY:
GRACE AARAJ, VISITING ASSISTANT PROFESSOR TO THE SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE AND ENVIRONMENT AND
SPATIAL JUSTICE FELLOW AT THE UNIVERSITY OF OREGON.

Dr. Miller’s work examines the capacity of Indigenous design knowledge in the production of supportive and resilientbuilt environments. Using ’Ike Honua (sense of place) as a central theme, Dr. Miller will address the mapping of Moanaontologies within planning and design frameworks for community resilience in Hawai’i along with the expansion ofMoana practices in diasporic communities on the continent. These interwoven narratives of Moana peoples willdemonstrate the power of Indigenous resurgence as a path toward long term resilience. The land-based knowledgesystems of Moana provide solutions that promote resilience in communities and the built environment and preserveand foster natural and cultural resources in building and adaptation strategies. Through his work, Dr. Millerdemonstrates the importance of Indigenous knowledge in raising up resilient and inclusive communities, highlightingthe importance of respect, responsibility, and reciprocity.
Dr. Miller’s work speaks to the importance of Moana knowledge (Indigenous knowledge of Pacific Islanders) within thesustainable and resilient production of the built environment as an oppositional perspective to that of Western,globalized knowledge that reifies the settler-colonial structures – most notably the othering of nature and the otheringof minorities. This provides a unique lens to examine processes of climate migration and placemaking withinexpanding Moana diasporas.

THIS LECTURE IS PRESENTED BY
THE UNIVERSITY OF OREGON CENTER FOR ASIAN AND PACIFIC STUDIES
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 2021 - 2:30 PM PST

You're not going yet!

This event requires registration.